1. The Irrigation and Water Resource Management Project (IWRMP) is financed by the World Bank (WB), the Government of Nepal (GON), and the involved Water User Associations (WUAs), and is being executed by Department of Irrigation (DOI). The IWRMP comprises four Components, A through D:

A – Rehabilitation and Modernization of Irrigation Infrastructure

B – Irrigation Management Transfer Reform

C – Institutional and Policy Support for Improved Water Management

D – Integrated Crop Water Management

This progress report confines itself to details relating to Component B, being implemented by the Department of Irrigation (DOI) under IWRMP.

 

  1. The overall objective of Component B is to improve irrigation service performance and service delivery to selected irrigation systems in the Terai through the completion and consolidation of Irrigation Management Transfer (IMT) to the relevant Water Users Association (WUAs). The component is designed to address problems exhibited in large public irrigation schemes (Agency Managed Irrigation Systems or AMIS) of below capacity performance, poor O&M, low cost recovery, and inadequate maintenance funds.

 

  1. The original scope of project interventions envisioned working in 9 subsystems, but was later reduced to 4 subsystems as shown in Table E-A:

 

Table E-A: Component B Irrigation Systems/sub-systems Command Areas

Irrigation System

Original Project

Original Scope Revised Project

No. of WUA

Schemes/sub-systems

Sub-Project Command Area

Schemes/sub-systems

Sub-Project Command Area

Ongoing Work Sites (Original Scope)

 

 

 

 

 

Kankai (KIS) (total system 7,000 ha)

Entire System

7,000 ha

Entire System

7,000 ha

1

Sunsari Morang (SMIS) (total system 62,000 ha)

Sitagunj SC

Ramgunj SC

Biratnagar SC

8,000 ha

8,400 ha

5,000 ha

Sitagunj SC

 

8,000 ha

1

Narayani (NIS) (total system 37,000 ha)

Blocks 2 & 8

Blocks 1, 3, & 9

Blocks 4, 5, & 6

6,000 ha

8,400 ha

6,000 ha

Block 8

3,000 ha

1

Mahakali (MIS) (total system 10,800 ha)

Stage I

Stage II

4,800 ha

6,000 ha

Stage I

5,100 ha

1

Active Sites Sub-Total

9   Schemes

61,000 ha

4   Schemes

23,100 ha

4

 

 

 

  1. An essential part of successful IMT is for the WUAs to be able to collect Irrigation Service Fees from farmers in order for the WUAs to be able to take responsibility for their share of O & M costs. The willingness of farmers to pay ISF depends, in turn, on the benefits they receive from the improvements to the irrigation systems in the IMT process. The progress in collection of ISF is presented below in Table E-B and accompanying chart:

 

Table E-B: Component B Sub-systems ISF Collection Progress (NRs)

 

ISF Items

KIS

SIS/SMIS

NIS-8

MIS-1

Annual Target (after 5 yrs)

4,336,000

5,600,000

1,800,000

3,738,814

Collections during the years:

 

 

 

 

2067/68

436,668

0

0

0

2068/69

373,502

0

35,000

971,000

2069/70

645,061

566,000

0

475,000

2070/71

728,000

658,000

0

644,261

2071/72

1,152,950

33,000

120,000

545,899

2072/73

1,342,000

0

0

1,168,422

 

 

 

  1. A key activity for IMT is to provide infrastructure rehabilitation and upgrading to the sub-systems, here referred to as Essential Structural Improvements (ESI). The progress in ESI for the different packages in the 4 Original Scope sub-systems is either complete, or nearing completion as summarized in Table E-C:

 

Table E-C: Component B Sub-systems ESI Progress

 

ESI Items

KIS

SIS/SMIS

NIS-8

MIS-1

World Bank, WUA - payable & contribution 100%

DOI, WUA - payable & contribution 100%

Additional ESI Works

 

 

 

 

     No. of packages complete

14

5

2

0

     No. of packages incomplete

8

5

1

9

 

  1. Unfortunately, the original scope of work in the IMT did not include ESI for tertiary canal works. This is causing difficulties (especially for SIS and NIS) for those farmers in tail-end areas of the subsystems because tertiary works in poor condition do not allow water distribution to some of these tail-end areas. This, in turn, makes farmers reluctant to commit to paying adequate irrigation service fees (ISF), most notable in Table E-B above for SIS/SMIS and NIS-8.

 

  1. A summary of training events is given in Table E-D and accompanying chart below:

 

Table E-D: Component B Sub-systems Training Events Progress

 

Topics

Before May, 2016

June 2016-Aug, 2016

Total

Grand Total

KIS

SMIS

NIS B-8

MIS-I

KIS

SMIS

NIS B-8

MIS -I

KIS

SMIS

NIS B-8

MIS-I

Target  Events

68

68

68

68

 

 

 

 

68

68

68

68

272

Completed Events

77

35

37

49

0

0

0

1

77

35

37

50

199

Progress %

100

51

54

72

 

 

 

 

113

51

54

74

73

Participants

4495

4093

2244

1991

0

0

0

28

4495

4093

2244

2019

12904

Male

3379

5420

1540

1489

0

0

0

24

3379

5420

1540

1513

11880

Female

1116

693

714

502

0

0

0

4

1116

693

714

506

3033

Female %

25

17

31

25

0

0

0

0

25

17

31

25

23

 

 

 

  1. Work is presently underway in each subsystem for preparing Asset Management Plans (AMP). The status of preparation is summarized below in Table E-D:

 

Table E-D: Component B Sub-systems Draft AMP Completion Date

 

Sub-projects

AMP Status

Draft AMP Completion Date

KIS

Inventory updating underway

September, 2016

SIS/SMIS

Inventory listing complete

November, 2016

NIS-8

Inventory preparation complete

September, 2016

MIS-I

Inventory updating underway

November, 2016

 

  1. Lessons learned from IMT work on these subsystems:
    1. Need to include all branch canal systems (or, headworks through tertiaries) in an IMT project. In this regard, KIS and MIS were good choices, whereas SMIS (21 blocks) and NIS (12 blocks) were too large, limiting the possible system changes in water delivery quantities and timing for project blocks due to constraints from other non-project blocks.
    2. Must include tertiary canal works in ESI because improvements at this level are most apparent to individual farmers.
    3. Avoid systems with major insufficient water supplies at headworks such as in SMIS where there are technical problems at the headworks (unless, of course, it is possible to include rectification of these problems in the scope of ESI).